Programmes

Daily programmes can be found below.

Time UTC+1 (UK)  Wed 9 June  Thurs 10 June  Fri 11 June  
9.00-10.00  Plenary: Multimodal Representations in Anti-Immigration Discourse: Language, Image, Gesture – Chris Hart  Plenary: Religious conversion and migrant integration – Ingrid Piller Plenary: What if … there had never been settlers? Thinking about coloniality, migration and language – Ana Deumert  
10.00-10.30  Short break with conversation rooms  Short break with conversation rooms  Short break with conversation rooms  
10.30-11.15  Panels  

A. Language contact 1: Hybridity & translanguaging 
B. Institutional framings of migration 
Panels 
 
A. Language policy and migration 
B. Education contexts and migration 
Panel 

A. Art and culture as practice and resource 
11.15-11.25  Comfort break      
11.25-12.10  Panels  

A. Language contact 2: Identity 
B. Media framings of migration 1: the mainstream view  
Panels  

A. Foregrounding migrant perspectives 
B. Student/teacher mobility and identity  
Open space for discussions around future collaborations – various topic-themed rooms will be open  

Planning of #AMLI2023 
12.10-13.00  Long break with social /networking events   Long break with social /networking events   Long break with social /networking events    
13.00-13.55  Plenary: “Britain has always been a safe haven”: Mythopoetic legitimation in UK immigration policy – Sam Bennett Plenary: TBC – Federico Faloppa  Film screening of Workers followed by Q&A at 13.45 with Ben Rogaly (Researcher and co-Producer) and Jay Gearing (Director and co-Producer)  
13.00-14.10 
13.55-14.00  Comfort break      
14.00-14.45  Panels  

A. Minority language/s and identity 
B. Media framings of migration 2: Alternative views 
Panels  

A. Language learning and migration 
B. The impact of Covid-19 on migration studies  
Panels 14.15-15.00 

A. Intercultural communication and migration 
B. Computational approaches to cross-linguistic insights in migration studies  
14.45-15.15 Short break with conversation rooms  Short break with conversation rooms   Short break with conversation rooms 15.00-15.30  
15.15-16.00  Panels  

A. Heritage languages: policy and practice 
B. Rhetorics of migration representation 
Panels  

A. Language ideology and migration 
B. Narratives and migrant identities  
Panels 15.30 – 16.15 

A. Un/Belonging and migration 
B. Intersectionality and identity in migration studies 

Daily programme: Wednesday 9th June

Time UTC+1 (UK)  Wednesday  9 June   
9.00-10.00  Plenary: Multimodal Representations in Anti-Immigration Discourse: Language, Image, Gesture – Chris Hart  
10.00-10.30  Short break with conversation rooms 

Rooms: 
1. Chatting about plenary themes (with Chris Hart) 
2. Chatting about our experiences as migrants 
3. Doing interdisciplinary research 
4. Just coffee chat 
 
10.30-11.15  Panel A: Language contact 1Hybridity & translanguaging 

– A high street of hybrid identity 
– In search of Hungaro-Romani 
– Speech borrowings and superimposition in the urban variety of Punjabi: Evidence from refugee centres in Italy 
– Grenglish: New understandings of the linguistic varieties of the British Greek Cypriot diaspora 
– Migrant Writing: A Genealogy  
Panel B: Institutional framings of migration 

– A corpus-assisted socio-political approach to the study of migration phenomena in parliamentary discourse 
– Collocational networks and subjectivity in judicial discourse: A corpus-based comparative analysis 
– ‘Become a global citizen’: Ironic cosmopolitanism and the discourse of citizenship-by-investment 
– The making of the unaccompanied children on Lesvos island: From legal discourse to everyday life 
– The ‘securitisation’ of higher education in the UK’s ‘hostile environment’ for migrants  
11.15-11.25  Comfort break   
11.25-12.10  Panel A: Language contact 2: Identity 

– Onward migration from Italy to the UK: a sociolinguistic perspective  
– Framing the Intersectionality of Indonesianness and Chineseness on the Indonesian Periphery 
– Language Use and Attitudes Among Croatian Immigrants in Sweden 
– Ethnolinguistics Rollercoaster from KSA to Pakistan: A Scrutiny of Linguistic and Cultural Identity of Third Culture Kid 
– Identity ‘trans’formation: migrant construction workers as informal interpreters  
Panel B: Media framings of migration 1: the mainstream view 

– Smooth criminals: discourse on humanitarian NGOs as a key feature of sovereignist  ideology 
– The Great Pretenders: Refugees in the European Press 
– A longitudinal comparison of the representation of migration in a corpus of British and Romanian newspaper articles published between 2006 and 2018 
– How are the Rohingya crises discursively represented in British online news media?  
– Exploring FORCE in Metaphor and Viewpoint phenomena in the multimodal representations of the refugee ‘crisis’ in online British newspapers 
– Constructing British National Identity: The Britain vs. Europe Dichotomy  
12.10-13.00  Long break with social /networking events  

1. Meet the editor: Journal of Multilingual & Multicultural Development – Jean-Marc Dewaele [start 12.30] 
2. Experiences of applying for funding 
3. Working with stakeholders 
4. Early career researcher hangout 
5. Just lunch chat 
 
13.00-13.55  Plenary: “Britain has always been a safe haven”: Mythopoetic legitimation in UK immigration policy – Sam Bennett  
13.55-14.00  Comfort break   
14.00-14.45  Panel A: Minority language/s and identity 

– Migration, language usage and identity in the Muslim community of San Andres Island 
– Hybrid Language Identity of the Second-Generation Immigrants in Cyprus 
– Handwritten Signature, Minority Language, and Identity: The Case of Palastenian Arab in Israel 
– Linguistic Identity of second generation of Arabic speakers in Italy 
– Minority language as one of the factors of self-identification 
– “I think I speak European!”: Tracing immigrant identities in Edinburgh, Scotland  
– Integration not Assimilation: Preserving Minority-Refugees’ Cultural Identity through Mother Tongue Education 
– Creole Identity and Transnational Migration in a Philippine context  
Panel B: Media framings of migration 2: Alternative views 

– Mapping pro migrant discourse on Facebook: The Belgian migration activist scene and its (re)configuration from 2014 to 2018 
– The Other Side of the Story: investigating representations of majority group citizens in minority media  
– Linguistic representation of migration in Italy (2013-2020) 
– Twitter and Refugeehood: Practices of Resistance in Contemporary Australia 
– Representation of migration: Perspectives from Kenya as a departure country 
– Emigration: Amnesia and nostalgia 
– A ‘burden’ or a ‘resource’?  Positive perspectives on migration discourse in Italy between 1900 and 1915.  
14.45-15.15 Short break with conversation rooms 

1. Chatting about plenary themes (with Sam Bennett) 
2. Who is a migrant? 
3. Working with disturbing data 
4. Working with multimodal data 
5. Just coffee chat 
 
15.15-16.00  Panel A: Heritage languages: policy and practice 

– Heritage languages in the Irish primary school context: an investigation into teachers’ attitude and pedagogical practice in the area of support for first language maintenance in bilingual pupils’ 
– Spanish as a heritage language in Europe and the United States: how academic performance is affected by group identity and collective self-esteem 
– Degrees of Belonging in Diasporic Contexts – Indexical scales of Vietnamese-ness in the UK 
– A disavowed community: the case of new Italian migrants in London 
– Land-Connectivity, Linguistic Resilience, and Identity among Urban Native Americans 
– An Ethnographic Case Study: Supporting Factors of Korean Canadian Children’s Bilingual Learning Within and Beyond the Heritage Language School  
Panel B: Rhetorics of migration representation 

– Discursive and Rhetorical approaches to Migration and Identity 
– Constructing the “acceptable EU migrant” in the UK Government’s Brexit-related documents 
– Linguistic Metaphors Shape Attitudes towards Immigration 
– Metaphorical framing of undocumented immigrants in the US: a cross-party examination  

Notes on timetabling: Please note that the major restraint on timetabling is the different time zones.  

Notes on social & networking events 

In most cases, the social and networking rooms will not be chaired. They are intended as smaller, friendly spaces where you can chat informally around the topic. You can drop into and out of these spaces as you wish. We hope they will allow space for the kinds of conversation you can strike up during breaks at an in-person conference.  

Conversation topics may be added/changed nearer the time – feel free to request some. 

The Early Career Researcher hangout is intended as an informal space for postgraduate students to meet each other – you are, of course, welcome in all other chat rooms too. 

Daily Programme: Thursday 10th June

Time UTC+1 (UK)  Thursday 10 June   
9.00-10.00  Plenary: Religious conversion and migrant integration – Ingrid Piller  
10.00-10.30  Short break with conversation rooms 

1. Chatting about plenary themes (with Ingrid Piller) 
2. Chatting about how we started working in AMLI topics 
3. Ethics 
4. Language loss and maintenance 
5. Just coffee chat 
 
10.30-11.15  Panel A: Language policy and migration 

– Sadhubhasha as the Marker of Cultural/National Identity and the Position of Muslims: Politics of Language and Identity Formation in Colonial Bengal 
– Integration of Repatriated Chinese Kazakhs in Multilingual Kazakhstan: Language, Culture and Identity Issues among Kazakh Youths 
– Narratives of (un)belonging: Language management and identity negotiations in two immigrant families in New Zealand 
– Language policy and linguistic human rights: A narrative inquiry into citizenship and (linguistic) identity among the Roma in Romania 
– Labor Migration and Neoliberal Discourses in Filipino Family Language Policies 
– Language Officiality and Migration in Andorra 
– Learning to Integrate, Waiting to Belong:  Language, Time and Uncertainty Among Newcomers in Germany 
  
Panel B:  Education contexts and migration 

– Education, migration and social inclusion: the case study of the Khouribga province of Morocco 
– Constructed subjectivities and self-formation: Rohingya students in New Zealand education 
– Metaphor in Representations of Migration 
– Encounter and categorisation: Discursive educational practices and their effects on young people’s ‘integration’ in the UK 
– Refugees in UK Higher Education: using narrative inquiry to investigate the lived experiences of sanctuary seekers and their English language learning journeys  
11.15-11.25   Comfort break 
11.25-12.10  Panel A: Foregrounding migrant perspectives 

– Search: Migration discourses (-migration). Challenging (linguist) conceptualisations 
– Subjectivities in migration. 
– Multimodal language biographical research across educational trajectories 
– Migrant’s perspective in the construction of visual and multimodal metaphors of migration in W. Staroń’s “Argentinian Lesson” 
– Where’s home? EU citizens as migrants. 
– The construction of agentic identities by refugees learning English in Scotland and the pedagogical implications.  
Panel B: Student/teacher mobility and identity 

– Temporary Language Teachers or Permanent Residents? Negotiating Migrant Identities in South Korea 
– On how to become a privileged migrant – the relationship between study abroad and migration perspectives 
– Combining observational and narrative interviewing 
data in study abroad research: a critical discussion on 
qualitative research methods 
– Inequality and resistance in the discourse around teacher migration: focus on ELT in Thailand 
– The language practices of mobile students in Europe: implications for identity  
12.10-13.00  Long break with social /networking events  

1. Meet the editor: Journal of Language and Discrimination – Massimiliano Demata 
2. Discussion of funding schemes 
3. Working with NGOs 
4. Early career researcher hangout 
5. Just lunch chat 
 
13.00-13.55  Plenary: TBC – Federico Faloppa   
13.55-14.00   Comfort break 
14.00-14.45  Panel A: Language learning and migration 

– Language practices in multicultural contexts: The linguistic immersion of Haitian children in the Chilean public school system. 
– Motivation to Belong and its Connection to Language Learning: Exploring Performative Practices with Refugees and Migrants 
– A performative language teaching approach in connection with emotion and identity  
– Online Learning and Conversation in Celtic  Languages: A Virtual Migration or ‘There and Back  Again’? 
– Migrant narratives of language learning and integration: struggles for legitimacy, deservedness, and the right to belong 
– Digital literacies and displacement: Working with NGO stakeholders to investigate language, migration and identity in refugee language lessons.  
Panel B: The impact of Covid-19 on migration studies 

– Discourse, opinion and episteme. Immigrants and covid-19 in the chilean press. 
– How attitudes to Covid-19 are affecting attitudes to migrants  
– Hate Speech and Xenophobia in Covid-19 Twitter Discourse: A Critical Corpus-based Analysis 
– Integration and adaptation in higher-education foreign students: a case study  
– Towards the anthropology of fairness: language and minority movements during the pandemic in Georgia  
– Reflections on a post-positivist study of migration and language 
– Supporting separated migrant children to thrive during Covid-19    
14.45-15.15 Short break with conversation rooms 

1. Chatting about plenary themes 
2. Using interview data in AMLI research: issues and experiences 
3. Working with metaphor 
4. Translanguaging 
5. Just coffee chat   
 
15.15-16.00  Panel A: Language ideology and migration 

– The Language Baggage: Unpacking Language Ideologies among Young Filipino-Canadians 
– Language skills are a ‘plus’: the limits of entrepreneurial multilingual nanny work in Britain 
– Appreciation of Family Language Practices in Migration Contexts? Insights from a Pilot Study 
– Language, education and migration: Using perceptual dialectology to teach linguistic and  cultural diversity  
– On myths and imaginations related to language, identity and mobility 
– “What she speaks is not even Greek!”: monolingual and monodialectal ideologies in a post-multilingualist era 
– Divergent language ideologies in a transatlantic minority:  Gaelic in Scotland, Nova Scotia and New England 
– Destigmatizing French Language Variations to Foster Learners’ Sociolinguistic Competence  
Panel B: Narratives and migrant identities  

– #fromGR2UK: New Greek migrant (dis)identifications in social media discourse 
– Unity or Multiplicity: Philosophy of Narrative Identity in Light of Contemporary Migration Dynamics and Crises 
– Desire and self-defence strategies in the talk of some Sicilian migrants 
– Negotiating (un)belonging in sites of entanglements – Spatial identities of German migrants in Stockholm Negotiating Linguistic Hierarchies, Racism and Identity: Multilingual Syrian Refugees’ Narratives of Language Use in Turkey 
– (Re)negotiating Identity Through the Use of Material Culture  
– How should a refugee sound? Credibility and the politics of listenership 
– From Rwanda to Canada, From Mother to Daughter: Intergenerational Diasporic Discourse About the 1994 Genocide 
– Intra-regional migration as a context for identity work: linguistic identity and rural-to-urban mobility within Galicia 

Notes on timetabling: Please note that the major restraint on timetabling is the different time zones.  

Notes on social & networking events 

In most cases, the social and networking rooms will not be chaired. They are intended as smaller, friendly spaces where you can chat informally around the topic. You can drop into and out of these spaces as you wish. We hope they will allow space for the kinds of conversation you can strike up during breaks at an in-person conference.  

Conversation topics may be added/changed nearer the time – feel free to request some. 

The Early Career Researcher hangout is intended as an informal space for postgraduate students to meet each other – you are, of course, welcome in all other chat rooms too. 

Daily programme: Friday 11th June

Time UTC+1 (UK)  Friday 11 June   
9.00-10.00  Plenary: What if … there had never been settlers? Thinking about coloniality, migration and language – Ana Deumert   
10.00-10.30  Short break with conversation rooms 

1. Chatting about plenary themes 
2. Chatting about dream AMLI projects 
3. Creating impact  
4. Just coffee chat  
 
10.30-11.15  Panel: Art and culture as practice and resource 

– Transnational learners: identity renegotiation and language learning in migratory contexts through art-related experiences 
– Discourse analysis approaches in arts-based research among refugee youths 
– Poetry on the Road – An Experiment in Multidisciplinary Co-creation on the Topic of Refugees and 
Migrants 
– Translanguaging art — Questioning boundaries in Monika Szydłowska’s ‘Do you miss your country?’ 
– Flamenco as a Means of Negotiating Identity 
– Digital Methodological Innovation: Linguistic Landscape Analysis in Riace, Calabria in the time of Covid-19  
 
11.15-11.25   Comfort break 
11.25-12.10  Open space for discussions around future collaborations – various topic-themed rooms will be open  

Planning of #AMLI2023 
 
12.10-13.00  Long break with social /networking events   

1. Meet the editor: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (JEMS) – Paul Statham 
2. Working with artists 
3. Decolonising migration research 
4. Early career researcher hangout 
5. Just lunch chat  
 
13.00-14.10 Film screening of Workers followed by Q&A at 13.45 with Ben Rogaly (Researcher and co-Producer) and Jay Gearing (Director and co-Producer)   
14.10-14.15  Comfort break 
14.15-15.00  Panel A: Intercultural communication and migration 

– Perceived disrespect and moral injustice in language discordant healthcare settings 
– Decolonizing naturally-occurring data in intercultural communication research: Lessons from the pandemic 
– Do intercultural communication barriers affect hospital admission rates?  
– Acquiring professional intercultural communicative competence without relinquishing cultural identity: A study of highly-skilled refugees’ labour market integration in the Netherlands. 
– ‘When I speak Polish, something special is created between me and Polish  people’ – Polish Café as a Polish language melting pot  
– The Role of Cultural Awareness in the EFL Classroom  
Panel B: Computational approaches to cross-linguistic insights in migration studies 

– Building a country-based lexicon of migration: Language on the Fly project 
– The stratification of migration policy lexicon: A corpus-based comparison between Italian and Arabic 
– Empowering communication through technology: migration and translation at a crossroad 
– Migration in a cross-cultural perspective: using distributional semantic to study discrepancies in the framing of migration across languages and countries.  
15.00-15.30 Short break with conversation rooms  

1. Future directions for research on migration, language and identity 
2. Migration and history 
3. Using corpora in AMLI research: issues and experiences  
4. How can we make research in AMLI more accessible? 
5. Just coffee chat  
15.30-16.15 Panel A: Un/Belonging and migration 

– Migration, language and what to expect from the future 
– A dream of belonging: the case study of Polish Jews – French immigrés 
– “And suddenly the foreign, the Other, is no longer so foreign” – Polish Café as a grassroots initiative of linguistic integration 
– Language, accent and the experience of belonging for the second-generation Irish from England 
– Migration and un/belonging in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence 
– Representations of (Un)belonging: 
A Visual Semiotic and Critical Media Discourse Analysis of German Political Cartoons 
– Second Homeland or Stepping-Stone: Belonging among Syrian University Students in Turkey 
Panel B: Intersectionality and identity in migration studies 

– Formation and life course impact of language identity:  
A case study of Japanese returnees from China 
– Language choices and intergenerational cultural transmission in intermarried families: a case-study of Polish-Ukrainian marriages 
– LGBTQIA* migrants as new speakers 
– Being Jongé Abroad: A Discursive Negotiation of Senegalese feminine identities. 
– Vini moun Tèksas: Becoming Texan 
 

Notes on timetabling: Please note that the major restraint on timetabling is the different time zones.  

Notes on social & networking events 

In most cases, the social and networking rooms will not be chaired. They are intended as smaller, friendly spaces where you can chat informally around the topic. You can drop into and out of these spaces as you wish. We hope they will allow space for the kinds of conversation you can strike up during breaks at an in-person conference.  

Conversation topics may be added/changed nearer the time – feel free to request some. 

The Early Career Researcher hangout is intended as an informal space for postgraduate students to meet each other – you are, of course, welcome in all other chat rooms too.